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Manchester Sash Windows | Reinstate Sash Window

Sash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash Window

Sash Windows Manchester | Reinstate Oriel Sash Window

 Sash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash Window Sash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash Window

Before and After our Reinstate Sash service.

Sash Window Specialist Manchester and North West undertook the restoration of this oriel window.  An oriel window is a bay window that does not reach to the ground.

To reinstate this oriel window back to an original double-hung vertical sliding sash window.

  • The casement window conversion was removed
  • The weight system reactivated
  • Replacement timber sashes fitted (3 pairs)
  • Draught proofing strips installed

Our authentic replica sashes are made by paying close attention to the fine details such as horn shapes and moulding profiles. These were copied from the original sash windows elsewhere in the property. 

 Sash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash WindowSash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash WindowSash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash WindowSash Windows Manchester | Reactivate Bay Sash Window  

 

North West Architecture

The impact of the industrial revolution still dominates the architecture of Manchester and the north-west of England.  But once outside of the Victorian cities there are heritage properties that reflect all aspects of English architectural styles.

The Industrial Revolution began in the latter half of the 18th century and changed agricultural societies more industrialized and urban.   The rise of large factories turned smaller towns into major cities over the span of only a few decades.

Industrialization and the textile industry brought great wealth to the north-west that funded the construction of impressive public buildings.  Many of these lavish civil buildings could easily compete with the finest in London. 

The invention of portland cement enabled the brick construction of large mills, warehouses and factories that all had employees needing housing.  Rows and rows of ‘2 up 2 down’ terraced house were built for the workers.  These homes had no front garden and so vertical opening windows were ideal.  The sash window was mass-produced, but homes for workers had budget windows constructed from 32mm thick timber sections.  Surrounding the rows of terraced homes were semi-detached homes for the managerial staff and a large detached mansion for the mill owner.  The windows and doors used in these period homes were far more substantial and have withstood the tests of time far better.

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